uluru-kata tjuta

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Experience the songlines of Uluru with Street View and Story Spheres

In the heart of Australia’s Red Centre lies the dual UNESCO World Heritage site, Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. It is home to the Anangu people, 21 species of mammals, 73 reptiles, 178 birds – and the monolith, Uluru. Starting today, people across the world will be able to visit Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park on Google Street View, walk on the desert sand and take in the vibrant hues of Uluru – from ochre to rust, wild plum and charcoal.

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Red rock to black rock

Ranger Matt Hudson recently left Booderee National Park (where he’s worked for 16 years), and headed to the desert for a second stint helping out at Uluru as head of the Cultural and Resources ranger team. There is rarely a dull moment for rangers working in the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, with wildlife conservation and land management demanding constant attention. The mala paddock is one of the park’s key projects. A 170 hectare area has been cleared of rabbits, cats and foxes to create a safe fenced environment for the park’s threatened mala (rufous hare-wallaby).

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Smoke on the rock

Warren Brown was in the right place at the right time when he captured this spectacular image. This amazing photo of a cloud over Uluru in the heart of Australia’s impressive Red Centre has captured the world. Higher than a 100 storey building – Uluru rises about 340 metres above the surrounding plain giving us dramatic sights such as this. Journalist/film maker Warren Brown was in the right place at the right time when he captured the picture with his phone, before it disappeared.

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Just another day on the job

Rangers at Uluru-Kata Tjuta learn a wide range of unusual skills out in the desert environment. We were challenged to test our courage while attending a snake-handling course this week. We spent a day with Rex Neindorf from the Alice Springs Reptile Centre learning how to safely capture and relocate some of the world’s most deadly snakes away from visitor hotspots and roadsides if needed. As the weather warms up, snakes will be enticed from hibernation in search of ideal sunbaking spots like roads, where they are in danger of being struck by passing cars.

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Uluru fauna survey captures some rarely seen species

The residents of Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park rise before the sun. Reptiles, marsupials and insects of all kinds roam at first light. In this ecosystem, it’s not just the early birds who get the worm. Park staff and Mutitjulu Community Rangers rose early for a special fauna survey to study the success of the park’s winter burning strategy. In 2002, most of the park was affected by wildfire.

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Writing to the World

Letter from Toby le="Letter from Toby” >}} A seven year old named Toby from Sheffield, England, has set himself an amazing challenge – to write to the world. His first goal was to send a hand-written letter to somebody in every country in the world, to ask questions about life and culture, and help people understand each other better. Toby began the project when he was five and wrote to every country before his sixth birthday!

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Celebrating 30 years since Uluru’s handback

Anangu have celebrated 30 years since Australia’s iconic Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park was handed back to the traditional owners of the land. The park counted down to the special day with a week of presentations at the Cultural Centre, where visitors learned from Anangu about Tjukurpa, handback, mai (fruits and seeds) and joint management of the park. On Saturday 24 October the celebrations began with a community day, barbecue and inma (traditional dance) at Mutitjulu.

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Junior rangers exchange cultural knowledge

Australia’s future Indigenous land managers have taken part in a cultural exchange where they learnt about one another’s environments and traditions. In September junior rangers from Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park welcomed their coastal counterparts, junior rangers from the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community in Booderee National Park, on the New South Wales coast. In October Booderee’s kids were able to return the favour – and host their friends from Central Australia.

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Best noses in business sniff out feral rabbits

_Steve Austin with rangers, Jim and Mel_ Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park is home to a protected population of endangered mala (rufous hare-wallaby), a species that is no longer found in the wild. Our mala enclosure is surrounded by a cat and fox-proof fence but rabbits have become a problem. They compete with our mala for food and shelter, which jeopardises the future of the population. In 2014 we performed a blitz with staff from across the Department of the Environment.

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Managing feral cats

Our natural and cultural resource and Mutitjulu Community rangers putting up a cat trap At Uluru we’re always working hard to take care of our native plants and animals. Our annual feral animal trapping takes place during the cooler months. Reptiles are less active at this time so there’s less food for feral animals - making them easier to trap. Cats are the biggest threat to native animals in the park.

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