travel

For newer Parks Australia blog articles please visit parksaustralia.gov.au/blog

11 things you never knew about Christmas Island

A tiny speck of land 1500 km off the coast of Western Australia, Christmas Island is one of Australia’s most astonishing natural wonders. The island is celebrating 60 years as part of Australia in October 2018 (it was administered by British Singapore before 1958). To mark our diamond anniversary, here are 11 things you probably didn’t know about this Indian Ocean gem. It’s got loads of crabs… Blue crab.

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#Animals #Birds #Our-Parks #Travel

5 bush foods to use at home

Bust out some new flavours in the kitchen without getting into a sweat. Crocodile Give a comforting pasta dish a lively shake-up - whip up a simple and delicious crocodile fettucine like this one by Zach Green. Photo by @zachskitchen via IG You can get crocodile from online store Something Wild, or search for specialty meat providers on Google and see what’s near you. Find out how Zach makes it here

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#Australia #Kakadu-National-Park #Taste-of-Kakadu #Travel

Meet the team behind Kakadu Kitchen

“We want to reconnect with our traditional diets and foods - replacing processed foods with locally- foraged bush foods and foods from our tropical food garden” Kakadu Kitchen launched at last year’s Taste of Kakadu festival, impressing guests with their modern bush food creations. At this year’s festival the pair will take guests on an exclusive four hour ‘Walk, Taste, Learn’ bush tucker tour at Murdudjurl Community (Patonga Homestead).

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#Australia #Kakadu-National-Park #Taste-of-Kakadu #Travel

Keep cool in extreme temperatures

With temperatures set to soar heat exhaustion and dehydration are very real dangers. These simple steps will help to keep you and your family safe while out walking in our parks and gardens. What to wear Wear a wide-brimmed hat, good quality sunglasses, strong shoes and sunscreen Eating and drinking Carry and drink at least one litre of water per person per hour We don’t recommend you drink sports drinks, diet cordials or caffeinated drinks as they can contribute to dehydration Eat regular meals, take frequent breaks and eat healthy snacks Consider taking an electrolyte product with you such as Hydralyte / Gastrolyte to replace lost fluids https://www.

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#Australia #Our-Parks #Travel #Travel-Planning

Recognise signs of dehydration

When temperatures soar there is a risk of serious heat-related incidents. These tips should help you get the most out of your holiday even if the mercury is rising. When it’s very hot it’s important to walk only in the cooler parts of the day - in summer we strongly recommend you walk only in the early morning, before 11.00 am. Before you head off to the beach, or set out to walk, familiarise yourself with the symptoms of dehydration and heat stress.

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#Australia #Our-Parks #Travel #Travel-Planning

Walking on sunshine at Uluru

Just a big rock? Guest bloggers and photographers, Corinne Le Gall and Maree Clout take the 10.6 km base walk around Uluru Photographically, Uluru is a visual delight. The scenery changes constantly, as does the mood of the landscape. Some parts are dry and sandy, just like you’d expect in a desert environment, while other parts are surprisingly vegetated and lush. The moment you first set eyes upon Uluru on the distant horizon, you get an idea of how much it dominates the surrounding landscape.

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#Australia #Our-Parks #Photography #Travel #Uluru-Kata-Tjuta-National-Park

Recognise signs of dehydration

Temperatures regularly reach 30 degrees Celsius or more at Uluru. Over the summer period (October to March) there is a risk of serious heat-related incidents when walking in the park. When it’s very hot it’s important to walk only in the cooler parts of the day - in summer we strongly recommend you walk only in the early morning before 11.00 am. For your safety, portions of the Uluru base walk are closed in high risk areas, where extreme heat and exposure is the greatest.

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#Australia #Travel #Uluru-Kata-Tjuta-National-Park

Stay safe in Uluru's extreme temperatures

Uluru is both a beautiful, and harsh, environment. Temperatures regularly reach 30 degrees Celcius - and when they reach 36 degrees Celcius we call them extreme temperatures. Heat exhaustion and dehydration are very real dangers here. These simple steps will help to keep you and your family safe while out walking in our park. What to wear Wear a wide-brimmed hat, good quality sunglasses, strong shoes and sunscreen Eating and drinking Carry and drink at least one litre of water per person per hour We don’t recommend you drink sports drinks, diet cordials or caffeinated drinks as they can contribute to dehydration Eat regular meals, take frequent breaks and eat healthy snacks Consider taking an electrolyte product with you such as Hydralyte / Gastrolyte to replace lost fluids https://www.

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#Australia #Our-Parks #Travel #Uluru-Kata-Tjuta-National-Park