parks australia

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Why chef Zach is hungry to share

“Cooking allows me to share kinship and culture” Taste of Kakadu chef Zach Green only discovered he was Aboriginal when he was 12. “My grandmother wasn’t allowed to talk about it – my grandfather would hit her if she talked about being Aboriginal so she had to hide it. It wasn’t until some years after he died that I found out.” “It was a real turning point in my life discovering I was not, as I has had always thought, a white Australian, but a first nation’s person.

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Surveying one of the world’s rarest birds: Part one

The Norfolk Island morepork owl has a lot on its plate right now (and I’m not talking about insects). This owl has overcome serious threats to its existence, and isn’t out of the woods yet. It’s listed as an endangered species under the EPBC Act, and while it shares this label with a number of other plant and animal species on the island, few hold the same place in the hearts of Norfolk Islanders.

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Surveying one of the world’s rarest birds: Part two

Over the first week we were treated with some spectacular sightings, lots of calls and an exciting discovery, which filled us with optimism for the species and the survey project as a whole. In saying that, owls are notoriously elusive so we quickly became acquainted with the challenges of owl surveying. boobook2 One of our roles as surveyors is to record observations of owl calls. When a team member hears an owl call, they note down the estimated location and by triangulating the owl calls, we can make a few assumptions.

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Reaching new heights

Sunrises and sunsets at the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park are something to behold. But going one step further and taking a helicopter ride over the amazing landscape provides a different perspective – whizzing across a sky that is blazing colour. We opted for a sunset flight with the very accommodating Professional Helicopter Services. Our very friendly pilot Ash was keen we had ‘the best shot at getting the best shots’, and after our safety checks and advice we were soon moving closer to Uluru and Kata Tjuta, cameras at the ready!

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World Ranger Day

Meet Kaylene McLeod, one of our newest ranger recruits! From reintroducing species that have been locally extinct for almost a century to battling the scourge of bitou bush along our coastlines and welcoming tourists from around the globe, there is never a dull moment as a Booderee National Park ranger. Becoming a ranger in January 2017, Kaylene is a local from the Wreck Bay Community. Her family has been integral in caring for Booderee National Park since its establishment in 1995.

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Threatened lizards on their way back

We’ve reached another huge milestone in our captive breeding program for blue-tailed skinks, releasing 139 of them into a ‘soft-release’ site. The site, an enclosed area of forest in a rehabilitated mine field, was cleared of wolf snakes and rats. It will allow us to see how they fare in a predator-free version of the ‘real world’, and is a significant step toward releasing them into the wild. The island’s captive breeding program began with 66 individuals in 2010, when we joined forces with Taronga Zoo.

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Experience the songlines of Uluru with Street View and Story Spheres

In the heart of Australia’s Red Centre lies the dual UNESCO World Heritage site, Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. It is home to the Anangu people, 21 species of mammals, 73 reptiles, 178 birds – and the monolith, Uluru. Starting today, people across the world will be able to visit Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park on Google Street View, walk on the desert sand and take in the vibrant hues of Uluru – from ochre to rust, wild plum and charcoal.

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Do I need a 4WD?

Part of Kakadu’s charm is its remote nature and wilderness environment – but that means there are several types of unsealed roads. Major unsealed (or gravel) roads can get corrugated and bumpy at times, they can develop deep ruts and patches with very soft sand. The smaller 4WD tracks in Kakadu can lead you through all kinds of rough terrain, a 4WD with high clearance and even a snorkel may be required to tackle rocky tracks and water crossings.

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Kakadu rangers reveal their tropical summer top ten

You’ve heard of the 7 wonders of the world. Spectacular as they are, we have some wonders of our own in the tropical summer season at Kakadu National Park. Now, for the first time, Kakadu National Park staff reveal their favorite ‘secret’ spots to enjoy the best of the wet. 1. Exploring the Upper East Alligator in your boat Ranger Trish says it is a ‘wonderland’ of crystal clear water, melaleuca forest and great barramundi fishing.

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Our threatened species team take on feral cats in Kakadu

You may have seen in the media a study by researchers under the Australian Government’s National Science Environment Program found that feral cats now occupy more than 99.8 per cent of Australia. Feral cats pose one of the biggest threats to our small native mammals. Unfortunately the Top End of Australia is not immune. That’s why Kakadu’s threatened species team have been developing an efficient strategy for management of feral cats.

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