our parks

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Five favourite photos from Booderee

Booderee is one of the most photogenic places in Australia - and that’s up against some stiff competition! What do you think? Which is your favourite? Brown antechinus This slightly adorable brown antechinus was a very popular contender in an online #cuteoff to find the cutest animal species in Australia. It’s not hard to see why. Kittys Beach Tell us there’s a sight more wonderful than a deserted shoreline and pristine ocean!

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Birds of Booderee

The Booderee Botanic Gardens is home to a huge variety of birdlife - and they are unfazed by human presence! The fairy-wrens happily hop up to visitors, posing for a photograph before continuing on their journey. The Casuarina Lawn is a wonderful place to see all manner of birds finding some lunch. Keep an eye out for kookaburras perching in the branches, surveilling the lawns for lizards, worms and other tasty morsels.

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Stay safe in Uluru's extreme temperatures

Uluru is both a beautiful, and harsh, environment. Temperatures regularly reach 30 degrees Celcius - and when they reach 36 degrees Celcius we call them extreme temperatures. Heat exhaustion and dehydration are very real dangers here. These simple steps will help to keep you and your family safe while out walking in our park. What to wear Wear a wide-brimmed hat, good quality sunglasses, strong shoes and sunscreen Eating and drinking Carry and drink at least one litre of water per person per hour We don’t recommend you drink sports drinks, diet cordials or caffeinated drinks as they can contribute to dehydration Eat regular meals, take frequent breaks and eat healthy snacks Consider taking an electrolyte product with you such as Hydralyte / Gastrolyte to replace lost fluids https://www.

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Encounter culture at the Cultural Centre

Guest blogger Maree Clout spent some time exploring Anangu life and history at Uluru’s Cultural Centre The excitement of reaching your final destination of the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park starts in your belly the moment you take the turn-off from the Stuart Highway onto the Lasseter Highway at Erldunda. This is the moment you realise that your first glimpse of the magnificent Uluru and Kata Tjuta will magically appear at any time.

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Whale-watching best at Booderee

Each year humpback whales and southern right whales make an epic journey to Queensland waters to breed. Then in the northern hemisphere spring they head back to Antarctic waters with their newborns. At these times of year visitors flock to Booderee to try and catch a glimpse of these enchanting, impressive creatures in the waters of Jervis Bay. The whales don’t disappoint. Large pods often appear, and whales regularly come into the bays and close to shore where they breach and play, with their calves close by.

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This timelapse video of Uluru will take your breath away!

Kartikeya Sharma only began practicing photography about a year and a half ago, but that hasn’t stopped him creating an epic timelapse video of Australia’s most iconic tourist destination. Kartikeya, a chef at the Ayers Rock Resort, had a good subject - the iconic Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park - on his doorstep. The video, which took ten months to complete, is a moving tribute to the outback, where dense clouds race and expand, shifting from dark blue to orange to black, and spectacular lightning storms lash the ancient rock.

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Photographing Norfolk Island

Guest blogger, photographer Zach Sanders takes us around his home of Norfolk Island. For me Norfolk Island is a photographer’s paradise. One minute I could be in the water photographing waves, turtles, sharks and fish only to jump straight out and photograph a completely contrasted landscape, with Norfolk Pines, jagged cliff faces and beautiful bay settings. Winter's Day | Zach Sanders Equally, under the surface around the island there are many breath-taking and exciting images to capture.

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Photographing Cocos (Keeling) Islands

The Cocos (Keeling) Islands are one of the most photogenic destinations in Australia. Guest blogger, photographer Karen Willshaw shares her professional tips to capture stunning pictures of this magnificent atoll. LIGHT ON THE JETTY It’s well worth getting up early and heading up to the old West Island jetty to capture the sun rising over the lagoon. Colours change rapidly and vanish as quickly as they change. Pro Tip: Allow plenty of time to set up - the colours of sunrise and sunset vanish quickly.

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Photographing Cocos (Keeling) Islands - beneath the waves

Guest blogger, Karen Willshaw shares her secrets for photographing the underwater paradise better known as Cocos (Keeling) Islands LIFE FROM BOTH SIDES The beauty of the Cocos Keeling Islands isn’t just reserved to the stunning beaches - life below the waves is equally magical. Snorkellers love floating from one pool to another around tiny Pulu Maraya at the southern end of West Island. As they float they discover a colourful natural aquarium of marine fish and life.

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Working from home

Uluru Kata-Tjuta National Park ranger Craig Woods reveals what it’s like working at Australia’s most famous natural landmark. For Craig Woods, Uluru is home. Craig is Anangu - and Anangu are the traditional owners of Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. “About 15 years ago I was coming out of school and wanted to do some casual work,” Craig says. “There was a program called Mutitjulu Community Rangers. I wanted to try something new and see where it took me.

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