our parks

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11 things you never knew about Christmas Island

A tiny speck of land 1500 km off the coast of Western Australia, Christmas Island is one of Australia’s most astonishing natural wonders. The island is celebrating 60 years as part of Australia in October 2018 (it was administered by British Singapore before 1958). To mark our diamond anniversary, here are 11 things you probably didn’t know about this Indian Ocean gem. It’s got loads of crabs… Blue crab.

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#Animals #Birds #Our-Parks #Travel

7 viral views of Uluru

Known for its rich array of colours, Uluru is one of the most photogenic places on earth. But these pics went above and beyond - creating feels across the world! Lightning at Uluru. During mai wiyaringkupai/kuli (around December), the park is at its hottest – there are storm clouds and lightning, but little rain. Credit Damien Hill 2012's solar eclipse is out of this world, hanging directly over Uluru | Photo by Steven Pearce Photography This cloud looking like steam coming off the rock - someone said it looked like a cake that just came out of the oven Mist caps the top of Uluru and rivers of rain run down the face.

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#Australia #Our-Parks #Photography #Uluru-Kata-Tjuta-National-Park

9 treats to tick off your bush food bucket list

Check these beauties off your food bucket list at Taste of Kakadu, and learn more about the foods that have sustained Indigenous people for thousands of generations. Green ants A limey, zingy treat that’s not be missed – look out for these little flavour-bombs in some surprising places like cheesecake and gin. Taste them at Green ant gin tasting Cocktails at the Croc Green ant ice-cream | Image by Kakadu Kitchen

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#Kakadu-National-Park #Our-Parks #Taste-of-Kakadu

Dine with a chef who likes to get messy

Indigenous chef Clayton Donovan like to mess things up – whether it’s entertaining diners with his genuinely warm and fun-loving spirit, or using his French chef’s training to create unique dining sensations. “My goal is to place my culture on top of things,” he says. “My culture and my cooking is unique – it’s not traditional. It’s my own style, my personal take on what I think I should be doing.

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#Kakadu-National-Park #Our-Parks #Taste-of-Kakadu

Keep cool in extreme temperatures

With temperatures set to soar heat exhaustion and dehydration are very real dangers. These simple steps will help to keep you and your family safe while out walking in our parks and gardens. What to wear Wear a wide-brimmed hat, good quality sunglasses, strong shoes and sunscreen Eating and drinking Carry and drink at least one litre of water per person per hour We don’t recommend you drink sports drinks, diet cordials or caffeinated drinks as they can contribute to dehydration Eat regular meals, take frequent breaks and eat healthy snacks Consider taking an electrolyte product with you such as Hydralyte / Gastrolyte to replace lost fluids https://www.

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Recognise signs of dehydration

When temperatures soar there is a risk of serious heat-related incidents. These tips should help you get the most out of your holiday even if the mercury is rising. When it’s very hot it’s important to walk only in the cooler parts of the day - in summer we strongly recommend you walk only in the early morning, before 11.00 am. Before you head off to the beach, or set out to walk, familiarise yourself with the symptoms of dehydration and heat stress.

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#Australia #Our-Parks #Travel #Travel-Planning

Sunrise to sunset at Uluru

Whether you are a professional, amateur or opportunistic photographer, no-one comes away from the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park without at least one obligatory photograph of sunrise or sunset. Many come away with both which of course is ideal in this unique landscape! Guest bloggers Corinne Le Gall and Maree Clout went in search of the perfect photograph From the lookouts dotted inside the Ayers Rock Resort to the designated spots throughout the park proper, there are plenty of options to choose from to get a great image of Uluru.

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#Australia #Our-Parks #Photography #Uluru-Kata-Tjuta-National-Park

20km of barriers, 31 underpasses and 1 bridge: getting ready for the great crab migration

This blog first appeared on the Christmas Island Tourism Association blog. It is reproduced with their kind permission. It’s that time of year, when we await the pitter patter of little feet. About 400 million little feet in fact, as our resident population of 50 million red crabs start their annual migration to the sea to spawn. There’s a lot of work to do to help them on their way safely, to divert them from traffic, which Parks Australia has already commenced.

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#Animals #Our-Parks

Walking on sunshine at Uluru

Just a big rock? Guest bloggers and photographers, Corinne Le Gall and Maree Clout take the 10.6 km base walk around Uluru Photographically, Uluru is a visual delight. The scenery changes constantly, as does the mood of the landscape. Some parts are dry and sandy, just like you’d expect in a desert environment, while other parts are surprisingly vegetated and lush. The moment you first set eyes upon Uluru on the distant horizon, you get an idea of how much it dominates the surrounding landscape.

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The Dream Trip - arriving at Uluru

Guest bloggers Maree Clout and Corinne le Gall begin a photographic trip through Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park Imagine picking up an autobiography, opening it up and reading “I was born, I lived, I died”. That would be interesting enough in both wittiness and uniqueness, but the reader would want to read more about the life of the author. The same applies to writing about Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. It would be easy to just say that there is one big rock and nearby there is a conglomeration of them.

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#Our-Parks #Photography #Travel-Planning #Uluru-Kata-Tjuta-National-Park