norfolk island national park

For newer Parks Australia blog articles please visit parksaustralia.gov.au/blog

Surveying one of the world’s rarest birds: Part one

The Norfolk Island morepork owl has a lot on its plate right now (and I’m not talking about insects). This owl has overcome serious threats to its existence, and isn’t out of the woods yet. It’s listed as an endangered species under the EPBC Act, and while it shares this label with a number of other plant and animal species on the island, few hold the same place in the hearts of Norfolk Islanders.

Posted

#Norfolk-Island-National-Park #Parks-Australia

Surveying one of the world’s rarest birds: Part two

Over the first week we were treated with some spectacular sightings, lots of calls and an exciting discovery, which filled us with optimism for the species and the survey project as a whole. In saying that, owls are notoriously elusive so we quickly became acquainted with the challenges of owl surveying. boobook2 One of our roles as surveyors is to record observations of owl calls. When a team member hears an owl call, they note down the estimated location and by triangulating the owl calls, we can make a few assumptions.

Posted

#Norfolk-Island-National-Park #Parks-Australia

First green parrots moved to Phillip Island

The green parrot translocation is LIVE! Seven Norfolk Island Green parrots, four females and three males were transported by boat over to Phillip Island on Friday. In conditions that would normally have stopped a trip to Phillip – rain and rough seas – over they went, leaving Norfolk about 6.30 am. In an ideal world we’d have waited for better weather, but if we had delayed it even a day, some of the birds may have fledged the nest.

Posted

#Norfolk-Island-National-Park

Success for the green parrot fostering program

The male green parrot feeds his new foster chicks Two trials of green parrot fostering have been very succesful in Norfolk Island National Park. Last year we found a nest of five chicks with two very small females failing to thrive because their older and much bigger brothers were getting most of the food. We decided to try a fostering program, and moved the two larger males to another active nest site - where they would be cared for by another pair of green parrots.

Posted

#Norfolk-Island-National-Park

Happy ending for nesting green parrot

Ranger Ken Christian checks a predator-proof green parrot nest for signs of nesting activity | Image by Luis Ortiz-Catedral Natural resource manager Abi Smith with one of the newly-banded chicks | Image by Cassie Jones We’ve just finished a tricky repair job on a green parrot nest - with a vulnerable parrot sitting inside on one already laid egg. The nest was in the bottom of a cordyline, and perfect except that it was open to predation by rats and cats - one of the biggest threats to green parrot survival.

Posted

#Norfolk-Island-National-Park

Green parrots nest in Norfolk Island National Park

The green parrots' breeding range is restricted mostly to the Mt Pitt area of the park We’ve seen a very successful peak breeding season of green parrots on Norfolk Island. There were seven predator-proof sites with eggs or chicks at one stage - and chicks from three of those have now fledged. In total we’ve had 32 successful fledgings since November 2013! The birds’ range may also be increasing - a new nest site has been discovered on private land and this is the first record of the birds breeding outside the national park in a very long time.

Posted

#Norfolk-Island-National-Park

Further boobook studies focus on genetics

Boobook chick on Norfolk Island | Photo Parks Australia Diurnal hunting and activity is creating interest and questions about the owls This summer has been a very rewarding season for park staff as we’ve seen the first recorded breeding of boobook owls in three years. We are now monitoring a family who appear to be thriving. But what is particularly interesting is the amount of daytime activity they are exhibiting.

Posted

#Norfolk-Island-National-Park

Boobook owl family thriving on Norfolk Island

Female boobook nesting on Norfolk Island Our new boobook owl family continue to pique our curiosity with their daytime antics on Norfolk Island. I was smacked in the head three times by the female when I first approached her nest to see how the family were getting on. It was quite a disturbing experience because as soon as I took my eyes off her she would attack – sweeping in with surprising speed and silence.

Posted

#Norfolk-Island-National-Park

Interesting whale bird season on Norfolk Island

Images of whale birds taken with our motion sensor camera | Can you spot the chick and the eggs? Great news! For the first time in many years, the protected whale bird (sooty tern) has attempted to breed on Norfolk Island– at the Cord section of the national park. It would be wonderful to think that they will continue to breed on Norfolk but they are facing a number of challenges.

Posted

#Norfolk-Island-National-Park

Boobooks back on Norfolk Island

A boobook looks out of the nesting box during daytime Night eyes! The male boobook feeds his family during the day Two boobooks spotted on Norfolk This summer season has been a huge relief for park staff – the first recorded breeding of boobook owls in three years! We’ve heard owls calling across the island, and there’ve been some great sightings by park staff and visitors.

Posted

#Norfolk-Island-National-Park