kakadu national park

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11 awesome animals in our World Heritage-listed national parks

(and not a kangaroo or koala in sight!) 1. Thorny devil This groovy creature is a small spiny dragon, one of the most striking Australian lizards. It walks with a strange rocking motion and has an unusual way of absorbing water - if the animal stands in a puddle or wet sand, capillary action directs the water up the legs and over the surface of its body, eventually funnelled through narrow grooves to its mouth.

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Darwin to Kakadu

Turn a road trip into a voyage with some fun stops along the way! Driving time from Darwin to Kakadu is roughly 2.5 hours but there are lots of sights to see along the way, so why not take your time? Fogg Damm Conservation Area is a beautiful wetland to stop and explore, with plenty of wildlife including many varieties of birds as well as water pythons and freshwater turtles. From December to July water lilies and other plants are in bloom.

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Kakadu National Park rangers win Ranger of the Year Award

From left, park manager Pete Cotsell with Fred Hunter, Joseph May, Timothy Henda, David Brown, Anthony Mann  How many people can honestly say they have worked non-stop on a project for 10 years? 15 years? Even 25 years? For more than 25 years the Kakadu National Park Integrated Ferals Team has worked hard at keeping our World Heritage Areas free of what Ranger Fred Hunter calls the smartest plant in Australia.

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Crocodile Dundee and Me: Bessie Coleman

‘Crocodile Dundee and Me’ - reflections of Kakadu Traditional Owners on the 30 year anniversary of the film’s release. Bessie Coleman’s story as told by Mikaela Jade A smash box-office hit, ‘Crocodile Dundee’ became a worldwide sensation, but as I find out from Bessie Coleman (senior traditional owner Jawoyn, Bolmo, Matjba and Wurrkbarbar peoples), the film is so much more for her family and other Bininj/Mungguy people. Here’s how it has permeated Jawoyn culture as a part of their modern dreaming.

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Discover Kakadu National Park this April

The first ever Discovery Month is in full swing at Kakadu National Park! Through the month of April visitors are getting the chance to connect with Kakadu more than ever before, with activities and demonstrations available every day. Savana Eccles usually works in the Bowali Visitor Centre but this month she’s been out and about in the park, leading visitors through the savanna woodlands and sharing stories of her childhood growing up in the park with her ranger parents.

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Monitoring toad-smart quolls at East Alligator

A family of quolls captured by a motion detection camera in Kakadu National Park | Image credit Department of Land Resource Management The northern quoll is a small marsupial predator that was once abundant in Kakadu. Sadly, after cane toads arrived in the park in 2003 we saw quoll numbers decline. Adult cane toads are highly toxic, and possess large skin glands brimming with a cocktail of deadly chemicals.

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Ssspecial sssight for Kakadu visitors!

Olive pythons can grow to almost four metres and are found right across northern Australia Driving to work in Kakadu isn’t always your regular trudge to work! One morning I was treated to a special wildlife encounter – an olive python, over three metres in length, crossing the Kakadu Highway right near the Bowali Visitor Centre. The python was making its way across the road, and I’m pleased to say everyone slowed down to let it get safely across.

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Kakadu’s grasshopper population healthy

The alyurr population have been monitored since January 2003 as fires can have a damaging effect on them. One of Kakadu’s iconic species – the brightly-coloured Leichhardts grasshopper is showing healthy populations across a number of survey sites. In 2012 a large, hot bushfire occurred and we expected to see less alyurr the following year. However, in January 2014 there was a huge increase in numbers at one of the regularly surveyed sites - from 13 to 800 individuals.

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How far does a flatback turtle swim?

Yurrwa heads to the sea after being fitted with a tracking device Every year Kakadu staff, traditional owners and volunteers camp on Gardangarl (Field Island) and study the turtles as they come ashore to nest. Last August we fitted satellite tags to two nesting females, Manbiri and Yurrwa, before they returned to the water, and we’ve been following them ever since. We’ve been monitoring flatback turtles on Gardangarl (Field Island) for over 20 years so we know Manbiri has laid many clutches of eggs.

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Kakadu celebrates World Wetlands Day

Kids scoop up wetland water to examine its wriggly contents under the microscope World Wetlands Day was celebrated in style yesterday at Kakadu National Park’s Bowali Visitor Centre. Locals and visitors, including this year’s Junior Rangers class from Jabiru Area School, enjoyed learning about the importance of Kakadu’s wetlands of international significance – and the work we’re doing to learn about and preserve our wetlands. Visitors at the Kakadu stand learning about bush tucker found in Kakadu’s wetlands The Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist (ERISS) fascinated visitors with the busy world of wetland water bugs seen under their microscope.

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