christmas island national park

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Blue-tailed skink

Soft release of blue-tailed skinks a success

In August 2018, Christmas Island National Park embarked on an ambitious project to save the blue-tailed skink, an endemic species now believed extinct in the wild. The project saw a group of skinks released into a rehabilitated, forested site within the park. Blue-tailed skink The soft-release site was extensively modified from its original condition. We removed all original rocks and fallen trees from the area before spraying it to eliminate centipedes (some 160 centipedes were removed from the site).

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Injured wildlife sign

Women in science – making a difference

Today is February 11, the United Nations International Day of Women and Girls in Science. To celebrate we’re catching up with Dr Tanya Detto, a scientist who works at one of Australia’s wildlife wonders, Christmas Island National Park. Tanya came to Christmas Island for a three-month contract eight and half years ago. She has been working to try and stop the decline of red crabs, which are found only on Christmas Island and are famous for their spectacular migration.

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Threatened lizards on their way back

We’ve reached another huge milestone in our captive breeding program for blue-tailed skinks, releasing 139 of them into a ‘soft-release’ site. The site, an enclosed area of forest in a rehabilitated mine field, was cleared of wolf snakes and rats. It will allow us to see how they fare in a predator-free version of the ‘real world’, and is a significant step toward releasing them into the wild. The island’s captive breeding program began with 66 individuals in 2010, when we joined forces with Taronga Zoo.

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The red crab migration in numbers

50 million The number of red crabs on Christmas Island! 100,000 The eggs a single female can brood 116 Maximum red crab body shell (carapace) size in millimetres 100 Possible density of female crabs per square metre when spawning 31 Underpasses installed 20 Kilometres of barriers Red crab migration - blue fence 12-13 Days females brood their eggs in a moist burrow

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11 Ways the Red Crab Migration is Awesome

Sir David Attenborough called it one of the ‘most astonishing and wonderful sights’. Here’s why! 1. About 50 million red crabs live on Christmas Island – the only place in the world where they are found. 2. The migration begins with the start of the wet season (usually October to December) and is fixed to a particular lunar phase. It can only happen before dawn on a receding high tide during the last quarter of the moon!

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Buff-banded rails thrive on Horsburgh

A buff-banded rail and five chicks caught on camera on Horsburgh An attempt to repopulate Horsburgh Island with the endangered Cocos buff-banded rails has proved successful, with the birds breeding well and stretching their wings. For many years, these small ground-dwelling birds only survived in Pulu Keeling National Park, on North Keeling atoll in the Cocos Islands. In 2005 a recovery plan recommended an attempt should be made to reintroduce the rail to at least one island in the in the Cocos group.

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Christmas Island mosaic stars iconic animals and habitats

A greater frigate bird and a golden bosun bird head toward a golden sun | Image by Sandy Robertson There’s a new work of art on Christmas Island - and this time it’s not just one of our iconic native animals. Its many of them! The mosaic is the achievement of Christmas Island Arts and Culture, and many of our famous natural attractions get a starring role, including seabirds, forests, and our iconic red crabs.

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Huge baby red crab return for Christmas Island

A female with eggs, surrounded by returning babies There’s a baby boom on Christmas Island, with a record number of baby red crabs returning from the ocean this year. It’s thought to be the biggest return in 25 years. Millions, perhaps even billions, of babies emerged from the sea in January – forming a stunning moving carpet across beaches, up sea cliffs, over walls, along roads and into the rainforest.

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Millions of baby red crabs return to Christmas Island

The people of Christmas Island are very pleased to witness another full cycle of this iconic island animal Baby red crabs coated Ethel Beach yesterday morning The sea stage of these new crabs' lives is over and they have now become land crabs For the second year running, there has been a fantastic return of baby red crabs from the sea and onto Christmas Island.

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Baby red crabs continue to return

Baby red crabs on Dolly Beach | Image credit Julie Graham Oh, baby! Image credit Julie Graham Baby red crabs on Dolly Beach | Image credit Julie Graham Baby red crabs on Dolly Beach | Image credit Julie Graham The baby red crabs are still returning to Christmas Island – The Cove has been busy with bubs, as well as east coast beaches Dolly Beach, Greta Beach, Ethel Beach and the resort beach.

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