Protecting Parks Australia’s migratory waterbirds

Sooty terns, Ashmore Reef. Image: Department of the Environment and Energy

Today in Singapore two of Australia’s important sites for migratory waterbirds, Ashmore Reef Commonwealth Marine Reserve and Pulu Keeling National Park, received global recognition.

Both sites, managed by Parks Australia, have been added to the East-Asian Australasian Flyway Partnership network.

Launched in November 2006, this voluntary partnership between countries aims to protect migratory waterbirds, their habitat and the livelihoods of all the people who depend on them.

The global network helps site managers like us to work cooperatively across the flyway – so we can ensure our migrating waterbirds are being conserved no matter where they land.

Ruddy turnstone, Ashmore Reef. Image: Department of Environment and Energy

Australia has 21 sites in the network. The addition of Ashmore Reef Commonwealth Marine Reserve and Pulu Keeling National Park, alongside the Adelaide International Bird Sanctuary, brings that number to 24.

Australia has been a partner of the network since its foundation in 2006.

For more on the network visit the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership website.

Bar-tailed godwit, Ashmore Reef. Image: Department of Environment and Energy