2015s

For newer Parks Australia blog articles please visit parksaustralia.gov.au/blog

New populations of Australian plants found following Bush Blitz

A new location for the rare Australian species Eucalyptus magnificata has been discovered in the Oxley Wild Rivers region in NSW, thanks to the latest Bush Blitz. Tim Collins from the University of New England (who just happens to be working on this species) couldn’t believe his eyes as we came across the plants. The species is only found in the northern tablelands of NSW, so another population of the plant is a very exciting discovery.

Posted

#Australian-National-Botanic-Gardens #Bush-Blitz #Parks-Australia

What's missing from this video?

We asked Martin Woschitzka and his team from Commercial Diving Solutions to check for marine debris at Pimpernel Rock in the Solitary Islands Commonwealth Marine Reserve while performing maintenance on the marker buoy. The results were fantastic. Nearly 20 years ago, Martin was part of a team that brought up over 1,000 kilos of marine debris from Pimpernel Rock. Unfortunately that debris is often a huge hazard to marine wildlife – they become entangled in it, and it was common to see sharks and other marine animals ‘wearing’ fishing gear, netting, rope and more.

Posted

#Parks-Australia

Writing to the World

Letter from Toby le="Letter from Toby” >}} A seven year old named Toby from Sheffield, England, has set himself an amazing challenge – to write to the world. His first goal was to send a hand-written letter to somebody in every country in the world, to ask questions about life and culture, and help people understand each other better. Toby began the project when he was five and wrote to every country before his sixth birthday!

Posted

#Uluru-Kata-Tjuta

Celebrating 30 years since Uluru’s handback

Anangu have celebrated 30 years since Australia’s iconic Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park was handed back to the traditional owners of the land. The park counted down to the special day with a week of presentations at the Cultural Centre, where visitors learned from Anangu about Tjukurpa, handback, mai (fruits and seeds) and joint management of the park. On Saturday 24 October the celebrations began with a community day, barbecue and inma (traditional dance) at Mutitjulu.

Posted

#Uluru-Kata-Tjuta

Christmas Island ready for annual red crab migration

_The island also has one crab bridge where it’s not possible to go under the road_ Red crab migration season is nearly upon us and rangers on Christmas Island have been busy preparing for the exciting annual event. The crabs have a long journey to make from the rainforests to the sea, and face many hazards along the way – including cars. The island has 31 underpasses built especially so the crabs can get safely across the roads.

Posted

#Parks-Australia

Junior rangers exchange cultural knowledge

Australia’s future Indigenous land managers have taken part in a cultural exchange where they learnt about one another’s environments and traditions. In September junior rangers from Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park welcomed their coastal counterparts, junior rangers from the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community in Booderee National Park, on the New South Wales coast. In October Booderee’s kids were able to return the favour – and host their friends from Central Australia.

Posted

#Uluru-Kata-Tjuta

An unexpected find in the heart of the Gibson Desert

_The tiny snail found at Kiwirrkurra_ When most of us think of snails we think of slimy garden pests devouring our lettuces, but Australia is home to over a thousand native snail species, many smaller than a grain of rice. And now Bush Blitz scientists investigating a fresh water oasis in the very heart of the Gibson Desert have found a tiny snail that could be new to science.

Posted

#Bush-Blitz #Parks-Australia

Learning more about witchetty grubs

Yalti and Alan Yen with witchetty grub Kiwirrkurra women have been helping scientists find witchetty grubs on the latest Bush Blitz, in Kiwirrkurra Indigenous Protected Area. Dr Alan Yen is studying the witchetty grub and how it’s used as a food source by Indigenous people. Witchetty grubs are high in protein and fats and have always been an important food source for these communities, but very little is known about the grub itself.

Posted

#Bush-Blitz

Monitoring toad-smart quolls at East Alligator

A family of quolls captured by a motion detection camera in Kakadu National Park | Image credit Department of Land Resource Management The northern quoll is a small marsupial predator that was once abundant in Kakadu. Sadly, after cane toads arrived in the park in 2003 we saw quoll numbers decline. Adult cane toads are highly toxic, and possess large skin glands brimming with a cocktail of deadly chemicals.

Posted

#Kakadu-National-Park #Parks-Australia

Ssspecial sssight for Kakadu visitors!

Olive pythons can grow to almost four metres and are found right across northern Australia Driving to work in Kakadu isn’t always your regular trudge to work! One morning I was treated to a special wildlife encounter – an olive python, over three metres in length, crossing the Kakadu Highway right near the Bowali Visitor Centre. The python was making its way across the road, and I’m pleased to say everyone slowed down to let it get safely across.

Posted

#Kakadu-National-Park