Conserving Uluru’s rich cultural history

Uluru ranger Craig Woods records Reggie Uluru’s oral history

Uluru ranger Craig Woods records Reggie Uluru’s oral history

Anangu elders are helping to capture Uluru–Kata Tjuta National Park’s rich ecological, cultural and historical knowledge by participating in the park’s oral history project.

Elders from are being interviewed both within the park and outside at culturally significant sites to produce video and voice recordings.

The elders are getting old, so the project is a high priority — particularly given the importance of their knowledge in protecting Tjurkurpa (traditional law), which is fundamental to the management of Uluru–Kata Tjuta National Park.

Miranda, Parks Australia

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